R is for Remembrance – Three Music Icons in One Post! #AtoZchallenge

Dick Clark died this week and for those of you who were too young to grow up with him, he was an American institution.

I learned the majority of my early dance moves from American Bandstand, and believe me when I say I can GROOVE.

Dick Clark’s show spanned generations: from Ritchie Valens to Luther Vandross; from the Monkees to Madonna; Dusty Springfield, Elvis Presley, Mariah Carey and more. Dick Clark hosted every show and introduced new dances like the “pony” and the “twist” to scores of young people nationwide.

Not only did Dick Clark help tons of artists break onto the scene, he was groundbreaking in terms of racial integration in music and on TV.

Rather than do what so many others at the time did and have white artists cover the songs of black artists, Dick Clark put everybody on, singing their own music.

Kids today can hardly fathom that this kind of segregation was the norm (thank God) and that’s due to people like Dick who recieved death threats when he traveled in integrated buses with the American Bandstand acts.

Below is a video of a very young Michael Jackson performing with the Jackson 5 on American Bandstand – listen to the voice on that kid! (p.s. both the pictures above are of Dick Clark and Michael Jackson.)


My favorite quote from Dick Clark:

“Music is the soundtrack of your life.”

And it is.

Here’s one of the early memories in my soundtrack – Davy Jones and the Monkees singing Daydream Believer:


Imagine my thrill when I was at a U2 concert at the L.A. Coliseum in 1997 and Davy popped up out of the stage. The whole audience was singing with him and Bono got on his knees and bowed. It was a moment…and I LOVE YouTube because here it is!

What’s on your early soundtrack? Do you remember American Bandstand? Did you ever dance along? Enquiring minds love to know these things here at More Cowbell!

Jenny

About Jenny Hansen

Avid seeker of "more"...More words, more creativity, More Cowbell! An extrovert who's terribly fond of silliness. Founding blogger at Writers In The Storm (http://writersinthestormblog.com). Write on!
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40 Responses to R is for Remembrance – Three Music Icons in One Post! #AtoZchallenge

  1. I watched American Bandstand every week as a kid. I’m kind of sad there isn’t a modern version of it on television.

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  2. LauraDrake says:

    After watching that, I’m not even embarrassed to admit I saw that MJ clip when it first aired! The Monkees clip reminded me how different it was to be a kid back then . . . I was SO lucky!

    We’re losing so many of the staples of our childhoods — too sad.
    Thanks for the memories, Jenny!

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    • Jenny Hansen says:

      LOL…Michael Jackson was 10 years older than I was so the Jackson 5 is a very dim memory for me, but my GOD, that kid had pipes!

      I know many people who are getting so sad to see all the greats passing on, and some of them so very young. It IS sad.

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  3. Pingback: Dick Clark, "Thank YOU" « Dr. Sherry E. Showalter – "Keepin It Real"

  4. Julie Glover says:

    At this point in my life, I can think of a lot of great performers whose passing I have marked. It’s sad to see the best ones die. But some of them lived great lives, and Clark is one of those. As to the U2 and Davy Jones clip, OH MY GOSH I would have cried with glee to see that in person. What a treat!

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  5. So many great memories with Dick Clark. A lot of life and business lessons too. (You can find a list of some below.) Thanks for sharing and paying tribute to him.

    http://abovepromotions.wordpress.com/2012/04/19/the-dick-clark-legacy-a-reflection-on-business-and-life-lessons-by-above-promotions-company/

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  6. I’m too young for American bandstand😦 The music I grew up to, though, was what’s now called “the Oldies station.” It was all music from the 60s and 70s (even back to the 50s). That’s what my dad loved to listen to, and so as a kid, I’d sit by his side and watch whatever he was doing (he’s a farmer so mostly working on machinery or driving a tractor or combine) and sing along.

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  7. Ahh, this is such a sweet post. These three guys will be so missed for such a long time. Thanks for the music!

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  8. K.B. Owen says:

    I loved Davy Jones (still remember the Brady Bunch episode he was in, LOL), and Dick Clark was timeless. Until his stroke, he seemed to never age! My friends and I would joke that Dick Clark had a curtained alcove in his home, with an aging portrait behind it, a la Dorian Gray. Yeah, we were all English majors, LOL.

    Thanks for the great memories, Jenny!

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  9. tomwisk says:

    Remember Dick Clark as an afternoon must in my callow youth. Davy Jones was part of an unsung(hear this R&R Hall of Fame) part of American pop music. I also can’t forget the late, great Levon Helm. He passed from cancer at age 71. Everybody should take a look at The Last Waltz, the best music documentary made.

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  10. mliddle says:

    Hi Jenny –
    I used to listen to the American Top 40 on the radio on Sunday mornings and sometimes watch the New Years Eve countdown – and many other tributes to music Dick Clark did. I have grown up either listening to or watching so many of the people who have died this year (and it’s only been 4 months!): Dick Clark, Whitney Houston, Mike Wallace (60 Minutes – loved him on that show!), Davy Jones, and Etta James (I used to listen to her earlier albums). I know I am only 41 years old; but since I was small some of these people were part of my childhood and into adulthood. Thanks for reminding me of these people instead of letting them slip by until the end of the year.
    Monique

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    • Jenny Hansen says:

      I know, it’s stunning to me how many greats have gone this year. I think Whitney Houston was the most tragic one, but they’re all sad. You’re only a few years younger than me, sister!

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  11. Pingback: Days Gone By-Remembering Dick Clark « Work the Dream

  12. jedimarri says:

    I never watched American Bandstand – but I love a lot music like the Monkeys and all the stuff that people consider “the oldies” these days. Loved these videos!

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  13. S. J. Maylee says:

    I do remember watching American Bandstand, loved it! I still remember Madonna’s line when Dick asked what her plans were or something like that and said: “to rule the world,” what a moment
    I also remember watching the Monkees, Davy Jones, what a dream boat🙂

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  14. Thank you so much for the Monkees clip. I loved them and remember sitting in front of the TV to watch their show. I grew up with American Bandstand. I also learned some of my moves from the show. Rest in peace gentlemen and we will always remember you.

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  15. Debra Kristi says:

    Love Davy Jones! I also remember the Brady episode he was in. And I also listened to the top 40 on Sunday. Good memories.

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  16. emaginette says:

    Losing Dick Clark was a big loss for everyone. He never aged a day.

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    • Jenny Hansen says:

      He really didn’t, until he had his stroke. I was so happy when he showed up to New Year’s Eve afterward, wheelchair and all. He didn’t want to miss it.🙂

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  17. John Holton says:

    My early soundtrack can be seen in the WLS Silver Dollar Surveys from the Sixties and Seventies, which you can see here: http://www.oldiesloon.com/il/wlsyear.htm

    I watched every episode of “The Monkees” when they first aired, and made a point of watching “American Bandstand” every Saturday at noon or thereabouts. My favorite memories of Michael Jackson are when he was the lead singer for the Jackson Five.

    And no, I neither sang nor danced along with the records. I can, however, remember all of the lyrics to all the songs now. I can go upstairs and not remember what it was that I wanted, of course…

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    • Jenny Hansen says:

      I thought that when MJ was with the Jackson 5, it was one of the last times he looked truly happy. He didn’t look happy to me his last 10-15 years, and he had SUCH talent, it was a shame.

      p.s. I have that “what did I come in here for” issue as well.🙂

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      • Hilda says:

        Hi Jenny,
        I think you are right in some ways, they were very close. seeing his brother’s heartbreak at his memorial broke my heart.. I saw in a video, Davy stated that the J5 use to comee by and swim in his pool in the 70’s with his family.

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        • Hilda says:

          Furthermore, Dick Clark sponsored many of the Monkees tours and visited them on the set . They never performed on Bandstand. Fans stated this on YT. It is ironic that MJ, Davy, and Dick all died from cardiac arrest. I loved Bandstand as a kid. I was also saddened by the trgic death of Don C of Soul Train fame. The Monkees were also groundbreaking in a way since they had a few minority extras on the show. Rare back then.

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  18. I vaguely remember watching it after we moved to the US from England. But I do know who Dick Clark is. I didn’t know that about the threats. That’s sad.

    I LOVED The Monkees. They were my favorite band back then. Them and the Bay City Rollers.

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    • Jenny Hansen says:

      He started in the 50’s and racial relations were still very tense here in the U.S. Dick Clark was groundbreaking in that he was all about the MUSIC. He didn’t care about color, he cared about talent.

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  19. Karen McFarland says:

    Oh. My. God! That U2 video was amazing! I would have loved to’ve been there! You’re so lucky! I was a U2 concert, but never with Davy Jones! He was my favorite Monkey and I watched him every week when I was a young girl. I think after Paul McCartney, Davy was my biggest crush. And I also watched American Bandstand every Saturday afternoon. And yeah, that’s where we got all the cool dance moves! I won’t say how far back that goes. Let’s not go there shall we?

    Thanks for the memories Jenny!🙂

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  20. Jane Sadek says:

    In Dallas, we had our own “bandstand” type show called Sump’ Else with local legend Ron Chapman hosting. Unfortunately, it wasn’t much else, but we loved it.

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