Do Writers Read Differently Than Non-Writers?

From our earliest moments, most writers are avid readers. We devour books – for story, for Craft, for new worlds and new ideas.

We have To Be Read piles (TBR for short) that are taller than small children. Our favorite authors and characters become our friends. If you simply love to read, you might feel this way too. (We writers LOVE great readers.)

I don’t know if we become students of the written word because we love to read or if we read because we were born to love the written word. All that chicken and egg Zen is well beyond me. I just flat out love books and every writer I know does too. It takes a lot of love to go through what we must do to yank our stories from our hearts onto the page.

If you are a writer, there are things that I know about you that I don’t know about the other readers I meet:

  1. I know you read odd things in odd places. If you are stuck somewhere without a book, you will begin reading any words available – shampoo bottles, food labels, billboard signs. Whatever. Books and magazines are preferred, but in a pinch, any words will smooth your soul.
  2. You read by flashlight in bed at night when you were a child. When your person-in-charge confiscated it, you waited 5 minutes before pulling the back-up light from its crafty hidey-hole. If they were on to you and confiscated the back-up, you tilted the pages to try to read by the light from the hall.
  3. When a book touches you, it is a safe bet that you will not only remember the details of that story, characters, etc…you will also remember where you were the first time you read it and what you were doing that day.
  4. I am certain that if you named 10 best friends from the various periods of your life (and were being honest), at least half of them would be book characters, authors or titles.
  5. When you go to a writing conference and see piles of free books by your most cherished authors, you get that same zing of attraction that you felt the first time you saw your honey.
  6. At these same conferences, when you are in the presence of your favorite author(s), your tongue gets tied in knots.
  7. You have rituals associated with your books. Whether it’s the way you clean them, sort them, store them or lend them, there is something particular you do with your books. And it makes you feel happy and peaceful when you look at your books after you’ve done it. (For me, it’s the way I order them and which shelf or room they’re in. My husband knows: don’t be moving my books without telling me. It makes me cranky.)
  8. Speaking of lending…writers love to share their book friends with their people friends. BUT…When someone borrows a treasured book from you and doesn’t return it – or worse, passes it on to someone else without asking you first – your friendship with them changes. You’re probably still their friend, but you’ll either “forget” to loan them books in the future or you will buy a copy from the used bookstore as a back-up and loan them that. There is an A-List of book-borrowers in your life and you love to have coffee with these people.
  9. When a book touches your spirit and transports you to a place you’ve never been, it’s not uncommon for you to read the last page, turn the book over and start at Page 1 to figure out how the author did that.

There are more things that I know about writers and their reading habits but I want to hear from any of you who are writers, or who want to tell on the writer in their life. For all the writers out there…what are your book rituals? Do you non-writers have book rituals too?? Which of the nine points above made you laugh? Enquiring minds always want to know here at More Cowbell!

Tomorrow, for “Lovin’ Friday,” I’m going to talk about some authors and books I love (and why). I hope you’ll come back and share yours with me. See you then!

Jenny

About Jenny Hansen

Avid seeker of "more"...More words, more creativity, More Cowbell! An extrovert who's terribly fond of silliness. Founding blogger at Writers In The Storm (http://writersinthestormblog.com). Write on!
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103 Responses to Do Writers Read Differently Than Non-Writers?

  1. Gene Lempp says:

    I read everything, including instruction manuals and maps (which makes me an oddity among men). Writers also tend to read for structure and subtext, at least I do.

    Great post, Jen🙂

    Like

  2. Kim Wright says:

    Great post! I’m extremely ritualistic about my books….so careful with moving them, so much so that one of my teenaged kids once said “What’s in this box?” and the other answered “I don’t know but based on the way Mom is yelling, either books or a bomb.”

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Kim,

      I’ll confess I almost spit coffee on my cell phone over this one…It’s so reassuring to know there’s others out there who feel as personally about books as we do, isn’t it?

      Like

  3. Well maybe a few fit. Heh. Heh. I was nifty with my mini lights as a kid and strained to read by street lights more than once. And I remember those who didn’t return my books…by name and location. Not to mention reading wall postings when out and about fiending for words.

    You have writers pegged!🙂

    Like

  4. LOL, Jenny. Yes! Another person who memorized the ingredients in Suave Shampoo. I was right there reading under the blanket after lights out.

    When I traveled, I USED to carry a butter knife with me to hold books open as I fixed my hair. It only takes a wee bit of brain to operate a curling iron. Security at Gatwick confiscated that butter knife years ago. Now, I have a nifty leather strap with weighted ends. It doesn’t send A/port security into a frenzy.

    On reading for craft, I leave stickies at times. But, I can NOT sit down with a fave and work through it with an analytic mind. Case in point: a fave I have read 10 times plus with the intent of reading for craft. Only the first 20 pp have notes. I get lost in the story. Nor can I read on work (write) days. If I like a book, say night-night writer’s brain until I reach the end. Instead, I use craft books. Maass’ WRITING THE BREAKOUT NOVELWorkbook pops creativity, gets me through downtime, and doesn’t kidnap me for a full day. Fond memores, Jenny. Thanks for another ROCKING POST!

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      You are most welcome, Gloria…I always write with my peeps in mind.🙂

      I’ll bet your butter knife did get confiscated, which is kind of funny because I’ve always thought those weighted leather straps would make great murder weapons.

      Like

  5. Stacy Green says:

    So true! I thought I was the only one who did the first one, lol. I’m always reading. And I do remember the books that touched me, the ones that kept me thinking about them for hours after I read them. I don’t like to share my books, though. I’m stingy!

    Like

  6. Oh, how well you know me. tee hee I can relate to almost all of this post.

    Thanks for the smile, Prudence
    http://www.prudencemacleod.com/

    Like

  7. amyshojai says:

    OMG, you’ve been FOLLOWING ME! Went down your list and CHECK, check, check, and CHECK! Sheesh, never thought of it that way but my whole family is the same. We kids used to fight over who got to read the back of the cereal box.

    Like

  8. Laura Drake says:

    Wow Jen, all this is true, and some I’d never heard (or read) before! I’m especially touchy about the book lending thing – one of the worst things that cuts you out as a close friend is not return one, or return a pristine hardcover with the papersleeve all jacked up. Man, that gets me steamed!

    When I’m reading along in say, a Barbara O’Neal (Samuels) or Jodi Picoult book, and hit one of those one-line zingers…you know, one line, describing a feeling, written in a way you’ve never seen it desribed that just nails the way you feel about it. I stop, read it over again, run my fingers over it….hmmmm.

    Love that.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      I’m with on returning a book in crappy condition. Get your own book if you’re going to treat it like that. Geesh.

      Ooooh, that tapping the fingers thing sent a shiver through me. That’s good. I make a very tiny upfold in the bottom of the page. You’d have to know what you were looking for to see it. It’s nice to know, we all get that “mmmmmm” feeling over a great line.

      Like

  9. I think you’ve pretty much nailed writers – except those of us with reading disabilities. I read so slowly I tend to stick with stuff I know I like and writers I know I like (like you and others I’ve met on Twitter). A lot of reading is like a painful death to a truly slow reader.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Thanks for the compliment, David, but now I’m sad for you that you don’t get to have one of those multi-book days where you gorge. It’s funny, I left that one out because I don’t get to have them anymore with a baby and I miss them soooooo much. I used to call them “Bed Days” and take like two a year.🙂

      Like

  10. I used to love sharing books but then #8 happened one too many times and now I don’t share. A friend is free to read anything in my house but a curse upon them should they attempt to remove the book.

    Book rituals…each room of our house has a book theme (Romance in the bedroom, Mystery in the guest bedroom, Thrillers and Suspense in the living room, Horror and any thing with sports in the Man Cave, etc.).

    Great post Jenny🙂

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Thanks, Raelyn! And I totally do that theme thing. Different things go on different shelves and in different rooms. My husband has kindly refrained from mentioning how weird it is. (I love seeing that it’s not that weird after all!!)

      Like

  11. Amber West says:

    Number two made me laugh, because I read my light of the alarm clock. I didn’t have a flashlight, and knew my Dad would notice if I grabbed the emergency one from its spot, so I’d take the digital clock and hold it up to my book.

    Is there a correlation between that and my horrible eyesight now?🙂

    Like

  12. Great post! Good to know I’m not the only one who reads cereal boxes and shampoo bottles. I read voraciously, and if I’m not reading, I’m working through a book scene in my head. When I read another writer’s books, I find myself appreciating their craft as much as the story. I admire the poetry of their words or the way they developed a character or their ability to describe a setting. And I definitely identify with #9 on your list!

    Like

  13. #3 – Bridges of Madison County – AMC Bowling Alley, Lubbock, TX – outside in my mom and dad’s car while they were inside bowling in a tournament.

    4, 7, and 8 too. 🙂

    I read for enjoyment 100% – unless it’s a craft book. If it’s a craft book, I break things down and study like when I was in school.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      LMAO, Tiffany. I read “Bridges” sitting in Miss Kitty’s Saloon (I was eating, I swear) in Jackson, Wisconsin. I was there doing a training gig for Nestle’s Purina plant, which stunk to high heaven. Thank God it was January. It was freezing so it smelled better AND it was totally acceptable for me to hole up in all my free time and finish that book!

      Like

  14. Terry Odell says:

    Had I known that reading the cereal boxes meant I was destined to become a writer, I wouldn’t have waited until I got my AARP card to start writing!

    Terry
    Terry’s Place

    Like

  15. And I thought I am one of those rare people who feel a need to read every word in sight, ha,ha. The labels on food containers, toothpaste, lotion, Lego boxes, not mentioning that entering a magazine aisle at a supermarket is a time-consuming disaster. Oh, and the books – no longer I read fast, concentrating on the plot only. No, I over-analyze the characters, the backstory, the grammar, the punctuation. But it’s all good — I feel like I enjoy the books much more than ever before🙂

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Nope, not so rare on this front, Angela. I would not have known other people did this until I started hanging out with other writers. I laughed when I read about the magazine aisle at the supermarket.🙂

      Like

  16. Amy Kennedy says:

    Oh my gosh. My bookshelves — don’t touch my freakin’ bookshelves. And don’t even think about telling me I should get rid of my books.

    My husband says to me,” Why do you have all these books…it’s not like you read them over and over.” After the red haze leaves my sight, I say — in a totally non-crazy voice, “I love my books, I can go to the bookshelf, pull off a favorite, open it to any page and start reading.”

    Then, when my head stops spinning and my voice returns to normal, I go to my shelves and pet my books.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      I pet mine too, Amy. And have conversations with them in my head. (I know my family members are going to read this and have an “A-ha!” moment about me. :-))

      Like

  17. I have enjoyed reading since I turned five. My problem began when I became an editor. Now I can’t enjoy a book as much, because I evaluate and edit as I read. Since I’ve been in Toastmasters a few years, I’m starting to evaluate people’s speech patterns. I count ahs and ums and then chide myself for it. I’m trying to let the left side of my brain take a nap while I read.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      OK, Arlene…I just made a note to myself to not ever consider becoming an editor. It would be too hard to lose that part of me….I feel for you. But now my hat goes off to editors more than ever!

      Like

  18. jamilajamison says:

    Yes, yes, yes, this list is SO true. Whenever I got in trouble as a kid, my parents would confiscate my books and make me watch television. When I was in high school, my books AND writing journal were taken away. These days, my books are sort of like my children, and little by little I have liberated all the books that were in my parents’ garage. My father once threatened to throw them all away when I moved out because they “took up too much space,” which made me see red for a second before launching into a tirade of the sanctity of books.

    Grad school sort of made it difficult for me to read anything without looking for subtext, which was horrible and depressing, because I couldn’t turn the sociological lens off (sociologists are terrible people to watch films with for that same reason). But since I’ve started writing again, I actually enjoy reading much more than I used to. There’s something wonderful about immersing myself into a story, and occasionally resurfacing to peer a little closer at sentence construction, or plot mechanics. I appreciate good books all the more, though I sometimes have to try not to feel intimidated by the prowess of great authors.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      I love it, Jamila. And I’ll bet you do watch movies differently than the rest of the world.

      Every time you start feeling intimidated by all those great authors, I hope you take heart in the fact that they were once “good” or “okay” authors, who kept going and practicing. Just keep writing and someone is gonna say the same thing about you: “Damn that Jamila Jamison just intimidates the hell out of me!”

      Like

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  20. Jonny Gibbings says:

    What makes you a writer, rather than someone who hasn’t bothered. Couldn’t read or write till my late teens so I guess I do to some degree. Some read and absorb themes, scenario’s jokes, flavours. It’s like your life experience puts a filter over what your eyes dictate. Love it when a book means something different to a friend you gave it too.

    Like

  21. Rebecca says:

    Oh, yes. Shampoo bottles and reading by the back of my alarm clock/radio’s nightlight. I got so practiced at pretending I was asleep, all the while feeling my book underneath me when Mom came to turn out the light, freaked out she was going to pull back my covers.

    She never did, and years later I had to convince her that I was really not asleep at those times.😀

    Nice to meet you!

    Like

  22. louisesor says:

    I laughed at and agreed with all the points above.
    A few of my own:
    1. I carry pens and paper with me always in case a story idea hits me or If I get another idea to add to a WIP. I even have a pencil and note pad on my exercise ellipse. I notice I’m a lot smarter when the oxygen is rushing through my brain and I usually get my stories and poems easiest when I’m chugging away.
    2. If I’m somewhere new and can’t write, I try to concentrate on the people and surroundings so i can better describe things in a story.
    3. I read a book and am observing the punctuation, paragraph structure and dialogue, and how they do it w/o using he said/she said all the time.
    4. I read a book and I am editing it; rearranging sentences. changing verbs for more oompf.
    5. A story has to hit an extraordinary vibe with me these days to keep my interest> I find it more fun to write my own now and try to keep them from following a formula or predictable plot.
    6. When I write a story I am becoming each character > multiple personalities makes life interesting : )

    Like

  23. Great post! I, too, read everything in sight: signs, labels, cereal boxes etc. Also read by the hall light or candlelight and I distinctly remember my mother instituting a ‘no books at the table’ rule so that we would talk at dinner time instead of reading. When I have a stack of books, I usually put them in ‘to be read’ order as if it were a meal. Starters (something light and fun), then progressing to weightier, meatier texts, ending with a romance or something sweet. Are you familiar with the verbal linguistic learning style? that’s probably most of us here.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      LMAO over the “starters” – I like the way you read. And if you scope out the comments, we’ve decided that the cereal boxes and shampoo bottles seem to be the “early indicators” for most of us writers.🙂

      Like

  24. Cedrics Mom says:

    What a great piece with lots of great follow-up comments. Yes, I have GOT to have something to read at all times. #1 is definitely me. So are 7 and 8. Anymore I just tell people to get their own copy. The publishing industry needs the money and I need to keep my books to myself.

    Like

  25. Bea Sempere says:

    Nice Post! I could truly relate to number 7. I have book rituals when buying, reading and when I’m done with the book. First the cover usually has to attract me, I read the blurbs, look for other author comparisons, and read the first page of the book to see if I like the author’s style. While I’m reading, I underline phrases that are unique to me and put a cross at the top of the page. When I’m done with the book, I transfer all underlinings into a notebook, and if it was one of my top favorites, I put a book place on the inside of the cover page.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Like

  26. Melysah says:

    I take part in 3-8. I think 95% of my friends are books, and I like it that way. I love foreign movies (just because I get to read). I have 100 or so to-read books according to GoodReads. I sort my ARCs by date-to-be-published (who came in the mail first) and also by genre (chit lit/YA or crime/mystery). I also read multiple books at one. I swap books with one friend who is an avid reader. I give her about 4 books and she gives me about the same. When we’re done, we return each other’s books and trade again.

    Like

  27. susie says:

    jenny knows writers! i didn’t realize i did those things until i read that i did those things. and you know what? i do those things! i loaned a favorite soft covered copy of These Is My Words to a good writer friend so she could read and learn about writing dialect. she loved the book and loaned it to someone i don’t know without asking me if it was okay. every time i see my friend i think about my book being with a stranger who most likely will never return it. i’m exhausted just writing about it.
    thanks for opening the window into the wacky world of writer’s and our love of books.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Yep, Susie. You are in the club. It pains me, the books I’ve loaned that have disappeared. I buy a replacement book for these, but it’s not the same. One of my girlfriends said she garage-saled the books I gave her and I about had a heart attack.

      Like

  28. I love and have to agree with #1. My mother used to say about me, and my hsuband still says that i erad everything. If we’re riding in the car, on a short trip, I read bumper stickers, and where we live there are tons of vanity license plates. I read those constantly, and he says, i never know what you’re reading. I was a voracious reader as a child and young woman. I have always liked to write, but only became serious in my older years. Once I became serious as a writer, the entire reading thing became difficult, I became the worse critic. But thanks for making me laugh. I must reiterate, #1 really got me going.

    Veronica Truesdale writing as Veronica L. Singleton

    Like

  29. louisecusack says:

    Great blog, and fascinating reading the comments. I’ve always read and written fiction, and didn’t realise there were other people out there who felt differently about words, and who can get through a meal without reading anything. For some reason I absolutely can’t settle with food unless I’ve got a book, a magazine, a letter, hell even junk mail. The television won’t cut it, and if I’m in company I find my gaze searching out menus or book covers nearby. Very rude, but its a compulsion I haven’t been able to shake!

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Louise, welcome to More Cowbell. I share the wish to read during meals. When I was single, me and my books went out on dates all the time. It’s very funny because there is a certain kind of man that sees you with a book and feels compelled to interrupt you and try to pick you up. It never worked (because, hey, my book was very often way more interesting) but I was surprised at how much it happened.

      Note to the single ladies: take a book to dinner and see what happens!

      Like

  30. Karen Oberst says:

    I resonated with most, but instead of reading in bed, I used to tell myself stories to put myself to sleep. Still do sometimes, and I’m way, way past childhood!🙂

    Like

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  33. Guilty on all counts! I read manhole covers; my sister sold some books I loaned her and I almost never spoke to her again!

    When my husband and I moved cross-country, the weigh station in Montana told us most household good loads were 2-3,000 pounds. We had 10,000. The officials asked us what the heck we had in there–it was books!

    Like

  34. OMG, I’d forgotten some of the things I used to do as a kid, like the torch under the blankets. I also went through a phase where I tried to read all the books in the library. I started with the bottom shelf and worked upwards. But the one thing I absolutely hate is pages that have been turned down to mark the place. I never, ever do it, and it pains me when I come across a turned down page in a book I am reading.

    Like

  35. hawleywood40 says:

    Wonderful post – I had several “oh yeah, that’s soooo me” moments reading it!

    Like

  36. Couldn’t stop laughing. There’s a grain of truth in this post.🙂

    Like

  37. I have to admit it’s a little scary to see myself in each of the habits you listed!

    Like

  38. Amanda-Lee says:

    There is definitely a chicken and an egg zen going on here. I was going to say that I suppose since children learn to read first then reading must come before writing…but what about those of us that made up stories to amuse ourselves before we could read which is apparently what I used to do🙂

    1. This is so true! and I didn’t even realise that I did it until I read it here. I read everything which makes it infuriating for my mum when she brings shopping home because i get caught up reading exactly how the washing powder works and all the kooky reasons for buying it – including “it leaves your clothes feeling and smelling great, which is exactly what that jumper deserves for keeping you warm all day”
    But in the car, walking in the street, talking to people *hangs head in shame*

    2. I was actually provided with a bed lamp because my mum got sick of never being able to find a flashlight. It made it easier for her to tell me to go to bed because she’s pull the plug out of the wall (at 1 in the morning usually) and walk out. On full moon nights I read by the light of the moon, when I was 10 my grandfather bought me my very own flashlight – for safety reasons of course – but he always kept batteries for me in the house because he knew what that torch was really being used for.

    3. I am actually like that with a lot of my books, not only when they touch me but when they tick me off as well. I remember certain smells, sounds, places and feelings. Sometimes I pick up a smell in the air, just randomly and it will remind me of a book.

    4. At least three quarters of them…as sad as that might sound, but they were better friends than I ever had in real life.

    5. Yes! I have actually never been to a writing conference, but there was a library sale a few months ago that had a crate of books for $1…they were all in my genre range…i felt that zing, i also nearly hyperventilated.

    6. Again never been to the conference, but even when I email them I carefully re-read everything I want to say…unlike everyone else I email lol

    7. Yes, I am regularly late for work because I get caught up staring at my bookshelf in all of its chaotic glory for up to 10 minutes at a time in the morning. I love the way my bookshelf is ordered, special shelves for each category of book (absolutely loved! liked or could do without having wasted the time) I am also very possessive of my books, I won’t ever throw them out.

    8. People have broken my trust one too many times when it comes to lending books. My ex kept one of my FAVOURITE reads for over a year, he even kept it after we broke up! I had my dad go to him and ask for it back….My dad is 6’4″ and built like a tradesman…he got it back pretty quickly.

    9. Yes I have done that about 4 times now. I don’t re-read often so that was a huge deal for me🙂

    I never thought so many people would be like me when it came to reading, probably because I’m just not surrounded by a reading community who also writes. I feel more at home now in my niche🙂

    Like

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  40. magamuffin says:

    Oh my goodness- you can read my mind! Ha! This was a great list. One thing I used to do as a child- once a week, we would go to a bookstore after going out to dinner (yes, books were dessert for my whole family) and on the way home, I would be in the backseat, holding the book up as high as I could, so that I could read my new book by the headlights of the cars driving behind us. When there was no car behind us, I would wait patiently for the streetlights to stream in for the like 2.3 seconds on my page.

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      That is fantastic with the street lights! It sounds like you have a wonderful family, especially because you never caught hell for reading by streetlamps. A reader has to do what a reader has to do!

      Like

  41. lissajean says:

    Wow! I can’t tell you how amazing it feels not to be the odd one! I have never met anyone who has finished a book and immediately started over again! My dad was appalled the first time he ever saw me do it!

    And reading weird stuff??? Yeah! I can recite to you the washing instructions for my hand towels in english AND in spanish!

    Also, I am so completely attached to my books. I remember not having time to read for fun in college, but I brought along my “favorites” and put them on my desk just so I could look at them. I would take a few moments with them and immerse myself in their stories even though I didn’t have the time to actually read them again and then move on to the rest of my day…it was like a quick study break! My Roomie thought I was crazy for bringing them just to take up space!

    There are several books that are still some of my best friends and I go back to them often, especially if I’m feeling down about something. Thanks for the post…it’s nice to know I’m not the only one out there!

    Like

    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Lissajean,

      You are fitting in wonderfully over here at More Cowbell. I’ll bet you had a heyday in the comments! I love that you had the discipline to just look at your books and pick them up for a few moments. Me? I have no discipline and I had to ask my friends to lock them in the trunks of THEIR cars until finals week was over. (After I’d wrapped my precious darlings in trashbags or boxes so they stayed pristine.)

      Like

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  43. #1 is my biggie from your list. I was akso known for wedging a book between the edge of the table and my stomach so I could read during dinner. Always borrowed the max #of books allowed at the library and rarely got them back on the due date. As per reaching ‘the end’ I’d start again just b/c I didn’t want story to end.

    Great post, Jenny!

    Like

  44. Cassie says:

    Numbers 1 and 2 definitely apply to me. Haha. I don’t know about the rest, because I’ve never been to a conference before and i don’t have any rituals.

    Like

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  47. This is a great post! Guilty as charged, except for the conference (haven’t been to one).When I was very young, I would read cereal boxes, ketchup bottles, anything that was on the table – I had to read something! I’m still like that. If I’m at the dinner table by myself, I have a book, magazine or my Nook propped up with something to read.

    I no longer lend my books out – I’d rather keep the books and my friendships intact!

    I’ve noticed writers who read alot also have an incredible ability to “tune things out” whilst reading. I know I do it (much to the consternation of my husband).🙂

    Thank you to Amanda for sharing this post —

    Cheers,

    Sherree

    Like

  48. Angelique says:

    Jenny — You’ve described me very well! However, I know several people who feel the same way about books and the written word who do not enjoy writing, and who never write unless forced to do so.

    Like

  49. Chazz says:

    Good post.

    The dark side: Writers read more critically, some to the point where they don’t enjoy reading so much so often.

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  50. Wow I had to scroll down a long way on this! What more can I say it all sounds sooooo familiar! Love the blog and love you to come and visit me at mine and please feel free to add me anywhere you like (Twitter, Goodreads, Facebook etc etc – all links on my blog)!

    Thanks

    John🙂

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  52. Shannon Esposito says:

    Wow…laughing and feeling understood at the same time. I went to the Miami bookfair 2 years ago to meet my favorite writer, Margaret Atwood and I seriously think I scared her. It was like meeting a rock star! She just commented on how big my eyes were…lol.

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    • Jenny Hansen says:

      Holy cow, you met Margaret Atwood??!! Dang, that IS like meeting a rock star (only better). Lucky you! Thanks for stopping by to tell us.

      You don’t mind if I name drop, right? As in: “That Shannon Esposito that commented on my blog last Wednesday? She MET Margaret Atwood!! *SQUEEEEE*”

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